September 26th, 2011

We made our second batch (or maybe it’s our third batch) of cut comb yesterday. It’s the last of the foundationless honey comb for this year. Our cut comb is messy and wouldn’t win any awards at the county fair — which is just the way we like it. That’s called keepin’ it real. Our method of making cut comb is simple: 1) Cut the comb from the medium sized frame. 2) Chop the comb into 18 little gooeily delicious squares. 3) Put the little squares of cut honey comb into little plastic containers. 4) That’s it. We also freeze the honey for 24 hours, but that’s something else. At any rate, it’s not the most exciting video, and it doesn’t hold a candle to my last video, Eating Raw Honey Comb, which, by the way, is the best darn tootin’ video I’ve ever posted, but here it is:

We also cut and strained a little over three frames of foundationless honey comb yesterday. I’ll post that video after we’ve bottled the honey.

September 23rd, 2011

I gave a friend some honey this past week, a jar of honey and a piece of cut honey comb. They took the jar but passed on the comb. I couldn’t believe it. I almost took back the jar of honey right then and there. Even now I wish I’d only given them a small jar. That’s right. I’ve become a honey snob. Sue me. I have no desire to give our honey to anyone who doesn’t appreciate it. You don’t like raw honey comb? You think it’s gross? No honey for you!

I had planned to describe the floral aromas and flavours of the honey in the video, but I became speechless as soon as I put the honey in my mouth.

September 21st, 2011

Drones don’t make honey. They only eat it. They also contribute nothing to the survival of the colony during the winter months. Hence, most drones are expelled from the hive in the fall as the temperatures begin to drop. Sometimes the worker bees will even chew out the remaining drone brood in the hive and toss the drone pupae out the front door (see Piles of Dead Pupae). Gross. Honey bees don’t mess around when it comes to their survival. Here’s a video I took this morning of several drones being expelled from Hive #1:

If you watched carefully, you may have noticed worker bees riding around on the drones like bucking broncos, biting and pinching them; at one point a worker bee grabbed hold of a drone and got taken for a ride in the sky; another worker bee tried to fly away with a drone; and many of the worker bees surrounded more than a few drones and pestered them until they were gone. And one drone got dragged out already dead. Good times.

September 20th, 2011

These photos don’t have anything to do with anything.


Read on . . . »

September 20th, 2011

THE FOLLOWING HAS BEEN UPDATED SINCE ORIGINALLY POSTED.

That’s right. I made a screened entrance reducer and it looks like this:

The wasps or yellow jackets hanging around our hives have become intense in the past few days. They’re constantly trying to get into the hives. I’ve added entrance reducers, but the entrance reducers also reduce the air flow (the hives don’t have screened bottom boards). The humidity builds up fast inside the young 2-deep hives when the sun comes out. So I made this screened entrance reducer from scrap wood, a piece of mosquito mesh, some duct tape and a piece of corrugated plastic from an old campaign sign I stole from a local politician who didn’t get re-elected. It’s just a prototype, but as you can see in the photo, the entrance has been reduced to about one bee-length while the bottom entrance space is still fully ventilated. Theoretically, it seems like a good idea. We’ll see how it works out.

UPDATE (Sept. 26/11): The screened entrance reducer works fine. Some of the bees get confused by the screen and it takes them a little longer to find their way back into the hive, but I doubt it holds them up any more than a solid entrance redcuer would. The general concept works. Now I just need devise as easier way to make them.

September 20th, 2011

I heard what’s often referred to as piping from the bottom of Hive #1 yesterday. (Read more about piping at Honey Bee Suite.)

Piping sounds usually come from newly emerged queen bees. We requeened this hive back on July 11th. I’m not sure what to think. Perhaps it’s not piping at all. At any rate, I got it on tape:

You might need to crank up your speakers.

September 18th, 2011

THE FOLLOWING HAS BEEN UPDATED SINCE ORIGINALLY POSTED.

I bought a wasp trap because wasps (or yellow jackets) have been showing up in larger numbers around our hives for the past week. The young hives could be at risk if we didn’t have entrance reducers on them. We partially reduced the entrances on the full hives. They should be okay. I bought the “Green Earth” Yellow Jacket Wasp Trap and Lure as extra production, though.

The plastic trap costs about $10, but it isn’t much good without the bait that cost another $6. (Not including the bait with the trap seems a bit deceiving to me.) I followed the directions and added apple juice and some meat (cat food) into the base of the trap. Then I added the $6 packet of wasp lure. Then I hung it up about twenty feet from the hives and hoped for the best. That was last weekend.
Read on . . . »

September 16th, 2011

I know some new beekeepers in eastern Newfoundland who read Mud Songs from time to time. If you’re reading this around 1pm on Friday, now would be a good time to weigh down your hives if you haven’t done so already.

According to the CBC, Hurricane Maria should smack into us right about now with winds around 120km/h (75mph), plus a whole lotta rain. My hives are well protected from the wind and have weathered through worse storms than this. But if your hives are out in the open, you might want to take some precautions.

September 14th, 2011

We crushed and strained another foundationless frame of honey last night. We cut and packaged some raw honey comb too. First we cut the comb from the frame:

Read on . . . »

September 13th, 2011

I got creative this summer and built a solid bottom board and a screened bottom board from scrap wood in my shed. I can’t continue to use either of them for long because the wood I used is old and half rotted and I’m afraid the boards will collapse under the weight of the hives during the winter, and around here that means damp and soggy, great conditions for softening up old plywood. So I went ahead and got more creative with my limited carpentry skills and woefully inadequate tools (or maybe it’s the other way around), and I built a new and improved sturdy bottom board that is both screened and solid. I won’t have a chance to put it into action this year, but I’ll show it off anyway. Here it is as a screened bottom board:

Read on . . . »

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