8 responses

  1. Jeff Harris
    September 29, 2010

    In time we’ll have the experience. But there will be growing pains along the way.

    • Phillip
      September 29, 2010

      Yup. One trip to the A man and most my concerns will be addressed. One thing I can say about this first year of beekeeping, especially since most of it is on my own, I am learning a lot. I’m curious to see what happens over the next few weeks. I’m pretty sure I’ll have at least one hive survive the winter. I just don’t know what one.

      And I’ll be overjoyed if both make it until the spring.

  2. jeff
    September 29, 2010

    The single I have has to make it through to spring.

    I made to boardman feeders tonight and decided to place them on the front. You want to talk about savage. Hopefully they are calmed down in the morning so I can install the entrance reducer.

    They were wild. I guess it doesn’t help it is 19°C in Clarenville tonight and it;s at the end of the season.

    • Phillip
      September 30, 2010

      They were wild. I guess it doesn’t help it is 19°C in Clarenville tonight and it;s at the end of the season.

      It was unseasonably warm in St. John’s, too, over 20°C. The bees in Hive #2 went even more wild when I added the frame feeder. Although Hive #1 is almost acting like they don’t have a queen. Bees can be strange.

  3. Jeff
    September 30, 2010

    Well I checked the two boardman feeders this morning. Keep in mind I didn’t add the feeders until 10:00 last night and each feeder has 750 ml capacity.

    One feeder is empty and the other is over half gone. Also I mixed the sugar water ratio 1.5:1, rather than typical 2:1 for this time of year. That 1.5 liter of syrup will be gone by this afternoon.

    I know I need to feed them a little more as there is still one frame they need to build comb on but they were savages. Even this morning coming on light they were flying and running around the hive like crazy.
    On a side note I have 4 boardman feeders made now, and purchased 4 single frame feeders along with the single frame feeder I already have.

    The plan is to make a tophive feeder over the winter to get the girls all excited in the spring. This will get their numbers up to allow for progressive splits.

    • Phillip
      September 30, 2010

      One feeder is empty and the other is over half gone.

      That’s about the same rate my Hive #2 was sucking up the syrup. (Hive #1 — I don’t know what they’re up to.) Installing the double frame feeder was a necessity for that hive. They still have a few frames to draw out from scratch, but the way they’re going at it, I’m not worried.

      Also I mixed the sugar water ratio 1.5:1, rather than typical 2:1 for this time of year. That 1.5 liter of syrup will be gone by this afternoon.

      Probably. Just for my clarification, what time of year should we feed them 1:1 syrup, and what time of year do we switch to a 2:1 mixture? Is it 1:1 in the spring and 2:1 in the fall?

      The plan is to make a tophive feeder over the winter to get the girls all excited in the spring. This will get their numbers up to allow for progressive splits.

      I ordered two tophive feeders from Beemaid, but I’ll be curious how your homemade feeders would out. It’s got to be cheaper making your own.

      We’ve got some weird weather coming our way — high temperatures. Early September, the temperatures took a serious dip and the bees starting cleaning house for winter. But now it’s like summer again. Must be confusing for them.

  4. Jeff
    September 30, 2010

    Bees, Welcome to newfoundland….. where the weather can change 4 times in one day.

    From what I have read spring and early summer is the time for 1:1, before the nectar flow. This helps build up reserves to get the numbers up. Then use 2:1 in the fall to allow quick top up of the frames for winter stores.

    Also they reccommend a strong feeding in teh fall more than in teh spring as it stronger, better foraging hive in the spring.

    Apparently bees are not as big on pollinating pears as they are for other fruit trees. I was a little disappointed when I read this as I have 3 pear trees in my yard. Along with 3 sweet cherries, 2 apricots, 2 plums, 2 pawpaws and a weeping mulberry. Next year I am adding, another sweet cherry, another pear, two more mullberry (the fruit is awsome, like english blackberries without the seeds), 3 peaches and hopefully 3 more plums. The apples will go in after I build the shed. That will be 4 – 6 trees, depending on rootstock used.

    Then we have strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, red currents, black currents, red and green gooseberries and a few nut trees.

    • Phillip
      September 30, 2010

      Man, I have to move to Clarenville.

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