11 responses

  1. Sam Smith
    April 6, 2011

    I could be wrong but this looks like a classic example of fanning, nasanov fanning they poke their buts in the air more, if it warms up a lot during the day condensation can be an issue my guess is they are trying to dehumidify the hive, fairly normal activity. So hard to wait for a flow to watch the bees bring in pollen, our forecast is all above 0 at night and getting warmer during the day. I remember last year pulling bees out of a wall at the end of april so 1/2 through should be some flow.

    • Phillip
      April 6, 2011

      I could be wrong but this looks like a classic example of fanning, nasanov fanning they poke their buts in the air more…

      I thought of that, but most the bees were fanning with their butts in the air, their so bodies severely bent, it was kind of funny. I just didn’t get many good shots of it. But who knows. It could be regular fanning too. I’ll make a note of that possibility in the video. Either way, they seem to be okay, so I’m too worried.

      We’ve got some warm (but wet) weather for the next few days. I hope it washes all the snow away. Then it’s supposed to get cold again. But I’m hoping by mid-April to feed the colonies to get them jump started — if the temperatures stay above freezing.

  2. Phillip
    April 7, 2011

    Hive #1 has been active all day today, bees coming and going from the both the top and bottom entrances. I don’t see them clearing out any dead bees. They’re flying more like foraging bees, not circling the hive but coming in from long distances, a moderate but constant stream of bees leaving the bottom entrance and landing in the top entrance. I see them flying all around the yard. It seems odd because it’s only 5°C today, the ground is still full of snow, and the hive is in the shade (I’m watching it now at 3:50pm). This is the same hive that shut down dramatically last September.

    Hive #2 shows no signs of life, though I see bees through the top entrance. The bottom board on Hive #2 is also very wet. Looks like that leak a few weeks ago was significant. I’ll be glad when I can put those bees in brand new dry boxes with a new bottom board.

    I may install top hive feeders soon.

  3. Emily Heath
    May 1, 2011

    “Does a bee need to stick its butt in the air to send out the Nasonov pheromone?”

    Yep, sticking their bums in the air reveals the Nasonov gland and exposes its scent to the air. Fanning then helps disperse the scent.

    The Nasonov pheromone is also used by scout bees to mark their chosen new home after swarming. It assists the swarm in arriving gracefully at their new location.

    Glad its warmed up a bit for you guys.

  4. Phillip
    May 1, 2011

    It was suggested that the bees may have been ventilating the hive, but I have no doubt now they were scenting. I’ve been watching them enough and I can tell their bodies don’t get nearly as bent when they’re simply ventilating.

    • Emily Heath
      May 1, 2011

      Also 15°C seems a low temperature for them to be ventilating at?

      • Phillip
        May 1, 2011

        Yeah, 15°C isn’t exactly stifling heat. I suppose there could have been some condensation build up if the temperature quickly went up to 15°C, but I don’t think so. Their bodies were bent, their butts were in the air — they were scenting. And I could smell it in the air.

      • Emily Heath
        May 2, 2011

        Ooh what did it smell like? I’ve heard people say lemony.

      • Phillip
        May 2, 2011

        I can’t remember what it smells like but it was very strong the day I took these photos and the video. (I think we’ve already had this conversation.)

        In the first comment for this post, I see now it was Sam who suggested the bees might be ventilating the hive to help remove condensation. That’s not a bad guess considering how quickly condensation can build up in the hive when the temperature rises quickly. I’m certain the bees were scenting, but they could have been scenting as well as ventilating. Why not?

        Now that we’ve settled that controversy, our active spring bees have had to deal with some seriously cool weather in the past week or so, and they’re not so active anymore. It’s below freezing today and cool temperatures are forecast for the rest of the week along with plenty of freezing rain.

        We were hoping to do out first full hive inspection this past weekend. We’re concerned that Hive #1, the active hive, could be on the verge of swarming. We need to check it as soon as possible so we can give the queen more room to lay.

      • Emily Heath
        May 2, 2011

        Sorry, hadn’t realised it was you I asked about the smell before!

        You guys really have it hard with your weather. We’ve had an unusually hot spring here and are currently enjoying temps of 15-18C after highs of 27C a couple of weeks ago. Have so much respect for your bees.

  5. Minnie
    July 29, 2011

    I was so confused about what to buy, but this makes it udnretsadnable.

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