Due Date: August 1st

I have a queenless colony of honey bees. I can tell because I pulled out a frame today with a supercedure cell — a queen cell — that’s a day or two away from being capped. (I’ll take a picture of it if I get the chance.) The bees are also a bit feisty, which often happens when a colony is queenless.

The queen will emerge in about two weeks because it usually takes about 16 days for the queen to emerge after the egg is laid, and the egg was laid two or three days ago. If my numbers are correct, the queen will emerge around July 12th. After that it takes about two weeks for her to mate and start laying. Add up all those days and it comes to about a month. So…

In theory, if I do nothing and let the bees work everything out themselves, I should see fresh brood in the hive by August 1st.

That’s (almost) exactly what I will do. I’ll add capped brood from one of my stronger colonies every four or five days to keep the colony’s number up during the full month in which it won’t have a laying queen, but other than that, the bees are on their own.

A photo of the hive in question taken one month later on August 3, 2015.

A photo of the hive in question taken one month later on August 3, 2015.


I could remove all the brood and bees from the hive and add them to one of my weaker colonies and be done with it. I could also reduce the colony down to a nuc box and move it to another beeyard where the new queen can mate with a variety of drones, which is probably the smartest thing to do because my beeyard only has two other colonies, so the queen is likely to be inbred if she mates in my beeyard. But an inbred queen isn’t the end of the world and I can alway requeen the colony later this summer when I have some well-mated queens on hand (which I’ve ordered from a local supplier).

So that’s my big plan and I’ll document it as well as I can. Let’s see what happens, shall we?

This falls in line with my general approach to beekeeping: whenever possible, leave the bees alone.

One thought on “Due Date: August 1st

  1. If you had a queen three days ago, it’s possible you still have a queen but the bees want to replace her, perhaps because she’s getting old or is not laying as well as she once was. Sometimes with supersedure the old queen and new queen will tolerate each other and lay side-by-side for a while after the new queen has mated.

    I have had no end of queen problems this year and from bitter experience agree it often seems to be best to leave the bees to it.

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