9 responses

  1. Tim
    May 7, 2012

    your video is marked as private Phillip

    • Phillip
      May 7, 2012

      Oops. It’s fixed now.

  2. Jay
    May 7, 2012

    Well, that’s not how I’ve BEEN painting them, but it will be now. Thank you!

    • Phillip
      May 8, 2012

      I stole this method from Rusty.

  3. Jeff
    May 8, 2012

    Nice looking boxes there Phil…

    • Phillip
      May 8, 2012

      Those are my last two Beemaid deeps. My table saw is more or less together now. (Almost there, no thanks to the instructions.) I hope by this weekend I can start making my own deeps.

  4. Honeypotter
    May 9, 2012

    Love your blog! Question for you. I’m an absolute beginner beekeeper and I have the yellow plastic cell foundation that seems like it has a waxy texture on it already, but at my Week 1 inspection it didn’t appear that the bees were even remotely interested. Do you usually add more wax to yours?

    • Phillip
      May 9, 2012

      They may not touch the empty frame for a while if it’s on the outside of the brood nest. I’ve seen full hives that completely ignore the frames on the ends. Some colonies build up and out first instead of out and up.

      When I’m starting from a nuc, I place empty frames between drawn out frames. The bees will go to work on the empty frames in no time then. That’s a safe practice as long there are enough bees to keep the split brood warm (if inserting empty frames splits the brood nest).

  5. Phillip
    July 29, 2012

    I made my first honey super today. Woo-hoo!

    I’m nowhere close to mastering my table saw, and the simple cuts I used are probably the worst type of cut for constructing a honey super, but I don’t care. It’ll never have to live through a Newfoundland winter. So it’s not just good, it’s good enough.

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

Back to top
mobile desktop