August 12th, 2011

THE FOLLOWING HAS BEEN UPDATED SINCE ORIGINALLY POSTED.

I made this bottom board from scrap wood I found in my shed today:

I cut the thick plywood 16.5 inches wide (about 42cm) and 2 feet long (70cm). The brace wood, if you want to call it that, was the same dimensions as a super, 20 inches by about 15 inches, something like that. The hive entrance (once a hive is placed on top) is about 1 and a quarter inches high, which is fine. It’s not pretty but the bees don’t care about pretty. I think it’ll work. I’ll post a photo of it in a day or two when I put a hive on top of it. I should have been making these all along. It’s way cheaper than ordering them from a supplier and having them shipped here. If you had to pay for the raw material, though, I’m guessing it would be less than $5.

UPDATE (Feb. 09/13): This bottom board has worked out fine. It’s ugly and half rotted now, but the bees don’t seem to care. Today I would use thick plywood instead of chipboard, and I’d paint it, but there’s nothing wrong with getting by with one made from cheap scrap wood.

August 11th, 2011

The original content of the post has been moved to the How-To page.

August 10th, 2011

I know this bee like the back of my hand.

Other photos I’ve recently uploaded but won’t bother posting: Bees drinking up vomited pollen; fresh natural comb from the honey super on Hive #1 — wide shot and close up; honey bees festooning on fresh natural honey comb from Hive #1; honey bee loaded with pollen on Hive #2 — front view and back view; grainy shot of a bee coming in for a landing; and another bee from Hive #2 resting with pollen.

THE FOLLOWING WAS UPDATED ON APRIL 08, 2014.

I made some improvements to the design of my ventilator rim (a.k.a. a ventilation eke). It’s still cheap and easy to make and should do a fine job at improving the ventilation of any Langstroth hive. First, I cut four pieces of wood for the front, back and sides of the rim. Here’s a shot of the side pieces:

Read on . . . »

August 5th, 2011

Here’s the HAL-9000 view of our “bee yard” (a.k.a. our “backyard”).

Our two latest nucs are on the far right. It’s a tight squeeze.

See comments for information on ventilation rims.

August 3rd, 2011

THE FOLLOWING WAS LAST UPDATED ON AUGUST 22, 2011.

Well, not really making a ventilator rim. I already made it and it looks like this:

Like the name implies, it provides ventilation for the hive. And as far as I know, it’s good to have on the hive any time of the year, though for the winter we might stick with our insulated inner hive covers. They worked out well for us this past winter.
Read on . . . »

August 3rd, 2011

I saved a bee from drowning yesterday.


SELECT 720p FOR HIGH DEFINITION AND OPTIMAL FULL SCREEN VIDEO PLAYBACK.

August 2nd, 2011

I got no love for drones these days, so it didn’t bother me when I saw a drone being pulled, nay, discarded from Hive #2 today. Way to go Hive #2!


SELECT 720p FOR HIGH DEFINITION AND OPTIMAL FULL SCREEN VIDEO PLAYBACK.

Hive #2 is about 80% foundationless, so they’ve got their fair share of drones eating up all their honey, nay, my honey!

August 2nd, 2011

THE FOLLOWING WAS LAST UPDATED ON SEPT. 14, 2011.

I finally got around to making two dummy boards today — also known as follower boards. Rusty over at Honey Bee Suite says:

    “…the bees can collect on the follower boards without sitting on the brood. In hot weather, the bees have a hard time keeping the brood cool enough, and sitting on it makes it worse. So both follower boards and slatted racks give the bees a place to “hang out.” This also reduces the feeling of congestion in the hive and congestion is a major factor in swarming.”

The dummy boards also reduce the risk of rolling the queen during inspections. All of which means nothing if you don’t know what dummy boards / follower boards are or why I’d want to make some, so read the following posts from Honey Bee Suite for an explanation of what it’s all about: Follower boards in a Langstroth hive and How to make follower boards for a Langstroth hive.

Kinda cool, ah? (I assume you just got back from reading those posts.) I made the two dummy boards by following Rusty’s instructions, though I did it all without measuring anything, and then I got creative and added a little extra something to the design at the end of it. I’m an incompetent carpenter, so by necessity I have to keep it simple.

I began by using a hand-held jig saw to cut the top bar down the middle:

People with fancy schmancy table saws can cut in a straight line. I’m not one of those people. It wasn’t exactly a smooth cut but close enough.
Read on . . . »

Someone emailed me a couple questions like I’m some kind of beekeeper who knows stuff. I got lucky, though, because the questions were easy. Question #1: What does drone comb look like? Answer #1: It looks like this:

Read on . . . »

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