December 3rd, 2012

Here’s a cell phone pic of our hives from this past weekend after we wrapped them up for the winter:

And here’s what they looked like about a month ago:

Check out the “Wrapping Hives for Winter” post on the How-To page for detailed instructions on insulating and wrapping hives for winter.
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November 5th, 2012

This is probably the closest video shot I’ve managed to get of the bees from inside the hive. (It zooms in and tracks along the comb around the 44-second mark.)

It’s from inside a honey super, not the hive per se. I gave most of the colonies between a half and a full medium honey super full of scraped and uncapped honey about a month ago. I’ll probably do it for now instead of topping them up with sugar syrup before winter. The honey comb is pretty much bone dry by now, but maybe the bees are hanging up around the comb because it’s been so warm that they don’t need to maintain a full cluster in the brood chamber.

October 20th, 2012

Summary: If you want the bees to pull honey down from a honey super into the brood chamber in a timely manner, scrape the honey first.

We left one medium super full of open and capped honey on each of our hives about two weeks ago so they’d have enough honey for winter storage (and so we wouldn’t have to feed them sugar syrup). Beekeeping is one manipulative trick after another — and the trick with leaving the bees honey is to get them to pull the honey down into the brood chamber. One method is to place a queen excluder above the brood chamber, then an inner cover and then the honey super above that. The honey super is interpreted by the bees’ brains as being apart from the hive, so, in theoretical land, they’ll tear into the honey and move it down into the actual hive, the brood chamber, before winter sets in. When we did this last year on October 23rd, we made sure to scrape open the capped honey first so the bees could dig in right away. We used this do dad called a capping scratcher (or you could just grab a kitchen fork):

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October 4th, 2012

Summary: Late season Goldenrod honey is more pungent and almost sickly sweet compared to early season honey.

We began stealing honey from our bees, a little bit at a time, beginning in July. Almost half the honey was in comb form, all natural and beautiful. The rest was extracted liquid honey in jar form, not exactly natural or nearly as pretty, but it’ll do you. The last batch of honey was extracted today — the jar on the left in the photo. Compare it to the jar on the right that was extracted a month ago.

Judging from its golden appearance and its flavour (almost sickly sweet and pungent), I think the honey extracted today is mostly Goldenrod honey. The honey we extracted a month ago is darker and the flavour is rich and earthy. Although it doesn’t qualify as a dark honey, I think much of the nectar for that honey may have been collected from Black Huckleberries that seem plentiful out in the country where the bees are now.

I didn’t have time to observe the bees this year, so I’m just guessing. It’s fun to wonder, though. Every batch of honey this year was different.

October 2nd, 2012

We harvested two medium supers of honey from two hives last year. The weather last summer was the pits. This year we harvested about four medium supers of honey from maybe four hives. This summer’s weather was incredible. We could have had truck loads of honey, but we didn’t because three colonies swarmed on us, two queens failed on us… and so on. T’was a difficult year. A year that made me realize what I like about beekeeping and what kind of beekeeper I want to be. Here’s a hint: I like bees, not beekeeping. For instance, I like seeing this kind of thing when I pull out a frame (click the image to a larger view):

That’s a partially drawn frame of honey comb I saw while harvesting the last bit of honey from our hives today. I only took about five medium frames in all. Most of the honey, like the capped honey in this frame, was left behind for the bees.

For each of our seven hives, I moved the honey super above the inner cover (with a queen excluder underneath), so the bees will move the remaining honey down into the brood chamber. That way they should have enough honey to get through the winter and I won’t have to feed them syrup before winter kicks in.

September 29th, 2012

I don’t have much to report these days. I don’t often see the bees, so what can I tell you? The final honey harvest will happen in about four days. I’m not sure what we’ll find. So far we’ve harvested about three medium honey supers. That’s not bad considering what our bees have been through this year. None of our colonies are in tip-top shape and only two are producing honey. One third of the harvested honey was comb honey (my favourite), some of it crystal clear crushed and strained (my second favourite because the honey comb flavour is still intact), and the rest was extracted (which is okay but not as philosophically pleasing). Our last batch of honey was mostly Goldenrod honey. Here’s a plateful of it I put aside because it was uncapped.

I don’t know what it is about Goldenrod honey, but it has a pungent flavour that is definitely an acquired taste. Like sweet sweaty old gym socks. Go figure.

September 27th, 2012

I had a foundationless deep frame full of honey put aside in our shed to give to one of our colonies before winter, nicely sealed in plastic so it would keep. Then some wasps got in the shed, found a hole in the plastic and obliterated the frame of honey. Check it out:

Nothing left but dry crumbly pieces of comb.

September 17th, 2012

When you run out of bottles for your honey, you make do.

I’m curious to see how well it pours. Could it be any worse than regular jars?

More honey photos in our Honey Album.

September 14th, 2012

I’m more of a bee-visitor than a beekeeper these days. I only see the bees a couple hours every week or two. It’s just not the same as having them close by and being able to watch them every day. I have little interest in continuing as a bee-visitor. I’m not selling off the hives just yet, but I don’t plan to do anything other than maintain the seven hives I have now. To take on anything more than basic maintenance is beyond my means for the time being, and it’s not much fun if I can’t hang out with the bees. The most fun I had this past summer was when I made a 4-frame extractor with a friend of mine. I’m not posting the plans for it because it’s a prototype and the design has some minor flaws that need to be corrected first. But it works beautifully, easily well worth the $120 I spent on it. Here’s a demo video of its maiden voyage:

By the way, the heating gun method of uncapping the honey works great. No fuss, no muss and way cheaper than an uncapping knife.

August 22nd, 2012

I’m still on vacation from the internet, but here’s a quick video we shot last week showing some baby bees emerging, chewing their way out of their brood cells:


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