(For beginner beekeepers in Newfoundland.)

I was asked by someone in Newfoundland about what books they could read before they get into beekeeping. My response got into more detail than I anticipated, so I’ll reproduce it here for the general edification of my legions of fans. But before I get into it, let me lay down a couple of confessions for you. (It’s okay to skip this part.) Confession Number 1: I don’t read many beekeeping books these days because I’m tired of reading beekeeping books. I’m tired of it for a couple of reasons. Firstly, I went nuts with beekeeping research when I got into it in 2009. Many beekeepers are obsessed and get drawn into beekeeping compulsively. It takes up all their free time. It’s always on their mind. That was me. But I eventually got over the obsessive-compulsive stage and now I only read beekeeping books at my leisure. I should change the name of this blog to The Leisurely Beekeeper. Secondly, my interest in honey bees took a serious dip last year after I was forced to move my hives to a rural location. When the bees were in my backyard, I was engaged in a daily fascination with them because they were there, constantly present. I loved it. But now I only see them a couple of hours a week, if that, and I rarely have time to sit and watch them like I used to. So the fuel that fired most of my interest in beekeeping — the constant presence of the bees — isn’t there. I still like beekeeping, but it ain’t what it used to be. Confession Number 2: I don’t mind recommending reading material for beginners, but… I don’t like to give advice and I’ve become suspicious of many beekeepers who do. Unless their advice has been tempered by at least a decade of trial and error, chances are, if they’re eager to give advice, I kinda get the feeling they might be feeding their egos. It’s easy to do. (Check out Honey Bee Suite for more on this topic.) And just because I have a beekeeping blog doesn’t mean I know what I’m talking about. I started this blog so others could learn from my experiences and my mistakes (notice how I emphasize mistakes). So to summarize my confessions: I don’t read many beekeeping books and I don’t like to give advice. Okay then…

davidburnsSo you have only a rudimentary understanding of beekeeping, you live in Newfoundland, and you’re wondering if there are any good books for beginners that you can read before you start ordering hives and bees and all that jazz. Well, I can’t think of a single book that covers all the bases, but my top recommendation for beginners online is David Burns’s Basic Beekeeping lessons. The preambles to his lessons can go off on various tangents, but the actual beekeeping lessons are the best I’ve found anywhere — in any book or online. He could easily sell the lessons in book form and make a mint. I studied his lessons before I did anything and referred to them all throughout my first year of beekeeping.

Next up, in book form, is Hive Management by Richard E. Bonney. It’s more geared towards second year beekeepers, but it offers plenty of general information that’s good to know before you get into beekeeping and most of the advice he gives is sound for people who live in a cold climate like Newfoundland.

Mark L. Winston’s The Biology of the Honey Bee provides an excellent introduction to the evolution and behaviour of honey bees. It’s not about beekeeping, but if you want to understand honey bees, this isn’t a bad place to start. (It’s available at MUN’s QEII Library in St. John’s.) Jürgen Tautz’s The Buzz About Bees — packed with fantastic photographs — complements it well.

The Backyard Beekeeper by Kim Flottum is worth having for the photos because they’ll show you what you’ll want to identify during your first year of beekeeping — various brood comb, the difference between workers, queens and drones, capped honey, comb with pollen, etc. Knowing what you’re looking at is very helpful. Other than that, though, it is not a bad general guide for first year beekeepers, but I wouldn’t call it the most practical guide, not for Newfoundland beekeepers.

After that, for the most realistic take on beekeeping, I go to the Honey Bee Suite website. I think I’ve read the whole thing, including the comments. It’s the only beekeeping website I read pretty much every day.

Michael Bush has a no-nonsense approach that I appreciate. I recently bought his book, The Practical Beekeeper (which duplicates his website). I don’t buy into everything he has to say, but he’s good at offering up simple solutions to common problems. His approach is practical, and I like that, but his suggestions are only practical if they fit your specific situation.

That’s why it’s important to not strictly follow the advice or methods of any one beekeeper. You always have to modify the methods to fit your local climate and eventually your style — how much or how little you want to put into beekeeping. It’s easy to be convinced by beekeepers who seem to be sure of themselves, so you go off and do exactly what they do — until you realize what’s easy for them is a headache for you because you don’t have access to the same resources they do, or you just don’t have the time for it. Or their methods don’t apply to your climate. For instance, Newfoundland beekeepers shouldn’t try to emulate the methods of beekeepers in warm climates like California or Arizona who pretty much live on another planet that has little in common with Newfoundland. All beekeeping is local beekeeping (see Honey Bee Suite for more on this). That’s about the only piece of advice I feel confident giving.

Anyway, it’s something to keep in mind while reading any beekeeping book or listening to advice from other beekeepers.

I’m sure there are tonnes of other beekeeping books out there worth reading for beginners. I’ve barely skimmed the surface. The reading list is endless. David Burns’s Basic Beekeeping lessons are probably as good as it gets for absolute beginners. Then once you get the lay of the land, let your fascination be your guide. It’s pretty cool.

Other reading recommendations are welcomed in the comments.

P.S.: Mud Songs isn’t a bad read for beginners, either. Start with Building a Bee Hive and go from there. The How-To page collects the more practical articles I’ve written since 2009, all of them geared towards novices, and the Bee Books category offers up some other reading possibilities too. Good luck.

P.P.S.: I will update this post whenever I come across any other good beekeeping books for beginners.

ADDENDUM (Sept. 30/13): I didn’t mentioned beekeeping forums such as Beesource, but they’re not bad places to visit from time to time. You just have to learn who to listen to and who to ignore.

4 Responses to “Reading for Beginner Beekeepers”

SKIP TO THE END
  1. Phillip says:

    This marks a brief break from my hiatus. I plan to get back to regular posting some time in the winter. Until then… back to the hiatus. See ya.

  2. Orla says:

    Hi Phillip,

    I’m moving to St. Vincent’s at the beginning of November and am interested in putting some hives up. Thanks for this blog. I look forward to reading it over the winter. I hope we can connect in person too. I’ve attended a beekeeping workshop this past year in Toronto and have been collecting info since then but I have a lot to learn!

    Cheers,

    Orla

  3. dan says:

    why did you stop posting your video’s n you tube ?
    I love referring my self to your video’s just for the simple fact your humble and honest in your different success and failures plus its pretty hard t find a Canadian bee keeper with plenty of video’s to refer to since as you say your self we leave in a different climate things are different so please keep up the good work I am in nova and your climate is the closes to mine i can find references to online

    • Phillip says:

      I’ve temporarily stopped posting videos for the same reason I’m on a hiatus from posting new content to this blog. Editing videos, even simple videos and writing regular blog posts with photographs is a lot of work. Along with my regular job, beekeeping and other interests, I just don’t have the time for all of it. So the blog and the videos are on hold until the beekeeping season is over.

      I have photos and plenty of videos on file from this past year. I’ll start sorting through them in November and probably start uploading and posting again December.

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