Making Sloppy Cut Comb

I made my second batch (or maybe it’s my third batch) of cut comb yesterday. It’s the last of the foundationless honey comb for this year. My cut comb is messy and wouldn’t win any awards at the county fair — which is just the way I like it. That’s called keepin’ it real. My method of making cut comb is simple:

1) Cut the comb from the medium sized frame.

2) Chop the comb into 18 little gooeily delicious squares.

3) Put the little squares of cut honey comb into little plastic containers.

4) That’s it.

I also freeze the honey for 24 hours, but that’s something else. At any rate, it’s not the most exciting video, and it doesn’t hold a candle to my last video, Eating Raw Honey Comb, which, by the way, is the best darn tootin’ video I’ve ever posted, but here it is:

I also cut and strained a little over three frames of foundationless honey comb yesterday. I’ll post that video after I’ve bottled the honey.

Eating Raw Honey Comb

I gave a friend some honey this past week, a jar of honey and a piece of cut honey comb. They took the jar but passed on the comb. I couldn’t believe it. I almost took back the jar of honey right then and there. Even now I wish I’d only given them a small jar. That’s right. I’ve become a honey snob. Sue me. I have no desire to give my honey to anyone who doesn’t appreciate it. You don’t like raw honey comb? You think it’s gross? No honey for you!

I had planned to describe the floral aromas and flavours of the honey in the video, but I became speechless as soon as I put the honey in my mouth.

Explusion of the Drones

Drones don’t make honey. They only eat it. They also contribute nothing to the survival of the colony during the winter months. Hence, most drones are expelled from the hive in the fall as the temperatures begin to drop. Sometimes the worker bees will even chew out the remaining drone brood in the hive and toss the drone pupae out the front door (see Piles of Dead Pupae). Gross. Honey bees don’t mess around when it comes to their survival. Here’s a video I took this morning of several drones being expelled from Hive #1:

If you watched carefully, you may have noticed worker bees riding around on the drones like bucking broncos, biting and pinching them; at one point a worker bee grabbed hold of a drone and got taken for a ride in the sky; another worker bee tried to fly away with a drone; and many of the worker bees surrounded more than a few drones and pestered them until they were gone. And one drone got dragged out already dead. Good times.

Piping From Inside The Hive

I heard what’s often referred to as piping from the bottom of one of my hives today. (Read more about piping at Honey Bee Suite.)

Bees on the entrance of Hive #1. (August 17, 2011.)

Piping sounds supposedly come from newly emerged queen bees. I requeened this hive back on July 11th. I’m not sure what to think. Perhaps it’s not piping at all. At any rate, I got it on tape:

You might need to crank up your speakers.
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