Buvay Zdorov

I have plans this summer that don’t involve posting edited beekeeping videos. A full-time job and other interests take precedence this time. Things repeat themselves anyway. Making splits, installing queens, extracting honey, etc. — just look at what I posted last summer or the summer before, back to 2010. Not much really changes. I will, however, continue to post pics and video clips on my social media feeds — Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. I hope you have a calm summer. Don’t take anything too seriously. Adios.

Revisiting The Magic Forest

Taking a peek at a colony I plan to split this year. I hope.

I’ve got at least two colonies that are in tip top shape.

00:00 — Top box packed with bees.

01:35 — Review of my basic hive set-up. Includes open bottom entrance, top notched inner cover entrance, black-painted hives and a ventilation rim with a pillowcase full of straw and wood chips.

03:55 — Defensive bees.

06:05 — An open feeder used properly.

May 2022 Beeyard Update

An update from my junkyard / backyard / beeyard.

I’m not upset about my dwindling winter colonies. This is how beekeeping plays out sometimes, whether through human error, environmental conditions or combination of both. Just look at the losses commercial beekeepers in Canada experienced this winter. Most of those losses are likely related to Varroa, which we don’t have in Newfoundland, but wintering losses are part of beekeeping no matter how you look it. I think it’s fair to say it happens to everyone eventually, even small-scale beekeepers.
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Beehives in the Magic Forest

The hives in this location are in sunlight for most of the day and are sheltered on one side. They are generally twice as strong (at all times of the year) and produce twice as much honey as any of my colonies that are closer to the ocean in Flatrock. These bees don’t get any special treatment (e.g., no winter wrapping), yet in the spring, summer, fall or winter, they are the rock stars of my beekeeping efforts.

As beekeepers, we like to give ourselves most of the credit, but the more I see it with my own eyes, the more I’m coming to believe that most of our success in beekeeping is the result of good weather in a good location, “bee whispering” be damned.

When Bees Toss Out Sugar Feed

A problem with the Mountain Camp method of dry sugar feeding is that sometimes the bees toss out the granules of sugar like they’re garbage. Maybe the bees are less likely to do that if they’re starving. All I can say for certain is that I use the Mountain Camp method — pouring dry sugar on newspaper over the top bars and sometimes spraying it with a bit of water — only when I can’t do anything else. Only when I don’t have sugar bricks available.


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