Quarter-Inch Mesh Doesn’t Always Knock Off Pollen

July 2019 Introduction: This post gets a little long, but I haven’t edited it down to be more concise because it demonstrates how my beekeeping practices evolve. At first, I just stapled quarter-inch mesh onto the bottom and top entrances to keep shrews out starting in October. Then I put it on just the bottom entrances so the bees could still get through the top entrances with no problems, at least until they began to cluster down for the winter. Then I switched to using push pins to attach the mesh because it’s less disruptive for the bees than the banging of a staple gun and it allows me to easily remove and reattach the mesh when I need to clear dead bees off the bottom board. And some people in Newfoundland only use half-inch mesh to keep mice out because they’ve never had problems with shrews. They’re lucky.

I was surprised to see some of my bees bringing in pollen today.

Honey bee bring in pollen on October 25th, 2015 in Flatrock, Newfoundland.

Honey bee bringing in pollen on October 25th, 2015, in Flatrock, Newfoundland.

Judging from the colour of the pollen, my guess is that it came from Japanese Knotweed. It could be Honey Clover too. I still see some of that around (what a fantastic plant that is). I saw bees from another hive bringing in yellow pollen, probably from Goldenrod, though it seems late for Goldenrod.

This is the first year I’ve used quarter-inch / 6mm mesh to keep shrews out of my hives. I was told to put the mesh on after the bees have stopped bringing in pollen because supposedly the mesh opening is so small that it knocks the pollen off the bees’ legs as they go through it. But that’s not exactly true. Every bee that came in with pollen today at least had no problem getting through with the pollen still intact. So…
Continue reading

A Mouse Chews Into a Frame of Honey and says, “Oh yeah, that’s it.”

I had some frames of honey stored in a swarm trap in my shed and a mouse found a way in and probably came back night after night and had a feast. Here’s a photo of a frame of honey that’s been partially eaten by the mouse:

mouse-honey-2014-09-29 09.43.33

Here’s the view from the other side of the frame. You can see how the mouse chewed through the plastic foundation and the wood of the frame.

mouse-honey-2014-09-29 09.43
Continue reading

Winter Preparations – Insulation and Stuff

March 2019 Introduction: This is another post where I go into some fine details of my beekeeping procedures that probably won’t do much to grab the interest of general readers. I’ll chime in at the end to comment on procedures that I don’t follow anymore, but this is really not the most exciting post I’ve ever posted. How I Prepare My Beehives For Winter is a more up to date version of this post, though even that is subject to change at any time.

It went up to a stifling 11°C yesterday (52°F), so I took the opportunity to insulate my hives for winter and staple on some mouse-proofing mesh. This is as simple as it gets.

Hives #2 and #1 with a piece of R-7.5 hard insulation over the inner covers (Nov. 3, 2011.)


Continue reading

Mouse-Proofing Mesh Doesn’t Keep Shrews Out

It’s March 2019 and I’ve deleted and retitled the 2011 post that used to be here (though the comments are still intact). But here’s the gist of it:

No matter how it’s installed, half-inch (~12mm) mesh will not prevent shrews from getting into a hive. Shrews, or more accurately, the pygmy shrew, can even slip through standard 3/8-inch metal mouse guards. That’s why I use quarter-inch (6mm) mesh to keep both shrews and mice out of hives.

I know beekeepers in Newfoundland who only use half-inch mesh to keep mice out of their hives and have done so for years. I took most of my cues from them when I first started beekeeping. None of them ever told me about shrews. I wish they had.

Half-inch (12mm) mouse-proofing mesh that does nothing to keep shrews out of the hive. (Oct. 9, 2011.)


Continue reading