Bad Beekeeping in November (2017)

November 30th, 2017.

Here’s a 23-minute collection of more behind-the-scenes cell phone shots, this time from November 2017 when I was still temporarily working with a single hive. It’s a good example of what not to do (though I’ve done worse). I’ll list the highlights after the video as soon as I have a chance to watch it all again.


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Show & Tell Beekeeping (for October 2017)

Here’s a 24-minute behind-the-scenes video that documents what I was doing with my bees in October 2017:

There’s more talking than showing and I pause the video several times to briefly discuss topics brought up in the video. The run time was originally 19 minutes but my voice-over diversions add another 5 minutes. Even though the video doesn’t show any hive inspections (I’m usually done with hive inspections for the year by then anyway), it covers a fair bit of ground, including:
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Behind The Scenes Beekeeping: August 2017

Want to hang out with me and my bees for 30 minutes? Here’s a video of things I did with my bees in August 2017. Just me, one guy, one hive. Prospective backyard beekeepers might like it.

I like the photos and the slow motion footage the most. I like the calm. Fireweed was beginning to die off in August and Goldenrod was just coming in.

I normally don’t post this kind of video, whatever normally is. I’m still sorting through a ton of cell phone footage that I have archived (that I’m now calling behind the scenes footage), looking for stuff that might be worth sharing.

Behind The Scenes Beekeeping: June 2017

This is a 30-minute collection of cell phone clips demonstrating some low-impact hive inspections and other things involved with single-hive beekeeping on the island of Newfoundland in June 2017. I know these cell phone videos aren’t the most exciting things in the world, but if anyone wants to see what it’s like to hang out with a beekeeper while doing beekeeping things, this is it.

The Cell Phone Chronicles continue with these highlights, if you want to call them that: The opening shot is a time-lapse of a dandelion opening in the morning sun, followed by a quick inspection of my one hive with lots of talking. 2:30 — my cats walking around my deserted beeyard. 5:30 — using a light bulb under my hive to keep the bees warm (a desperate move which I’ll probably never do again). 11:15 — how I store honey frames outside. 14:00 — checking out the bees on a dying dogberry tree. The video ends with some honey bees flying around dandelions in slow motion. The video shows several low key hive inspections with lots of talk about what I’m doing and why I’m doing it.

Behind The Scenes Beekeeping: May 2017

Here’s a 10-minute partially-narrated collection of cell phone clips taken from May 2017 next to my house in Flatrock, Newfoundland. I talk about how the bees are friendliest in the spring. There are several slow motion shots and quiet moments with the bees crawling over my hands. This is the first of the Cell Phone Chronicles to show some signs of life with the bees. This might actually get good soon.

October 2019 Postscript: I don’t have any videos or photos from April 2017 because I had to lease out all my hives except for one to a friend so I could focus on recovering from a concussion injury. Having one hive around instead of nine was relaxing and just what I needed at the time. My beekeeping would max out at a single hive until June 2018.

Behind the Scenes Beekeeping: March 2017

These Amazing Cell Phone Chronicles from March 2017 are only 6 minutes long. The big event in this video, I suppose, is the storm that blew 180 kph (112 mph) winds through my beeyard. Spoiler: My bees got through it without a scratch.

I have to say, I love my sheltered little beeyard. Big old storms roll in and I never worry about it. I don’t need to secure my bees down with ratchet straps. I don’t even need to weigh them down with bricks (though I usually do just to be safe). The only downside to my beeyard, other than being too close to a freezing ocean, is that my bees aren’t in full sun all day long. I’ve never kept my bees in full sun and it’s never been a problem, but I kinda get the feeling that being so close to the ocean — well, that’s the tipping point. It’s still too early in the game to make that call, but without the heat of full-day sunshine, in my particular area, I get the feeling my bees just don’t build up as strongly as they used to when I kept them farther inland. I can’t say for sure, but that’s where my suspicions are going. It’s one of the reasons I’ve begun to paint my hives black, which under normal circumstances seems like a bad idea, but I’m not sure keeping bees a kilometre (0.62 miles) from the Labrador Current (I can see it from my house) is a normal beekeeping circumstance.

October 2019 Postscript: I look at this video and, again, see a few things I’d do differently today — things I’m still experimenting with. I think I prefer a different kind of wrap, namely corrugated plastic, to fend off all the melting snow and provide a little more insulation. I know roofing felt acts as a windbreak and provides some heat in the sun, but it also gets soaked and stays cold and wet for days or weeks. That never sits well with me. Some of the rims and moisture quilts seem a bit too loose; too much cold air getting in. I think generally I need to do more to keep my bees warm, mainly because the air where I live coming off the North Atlantic Ocean is so damp and bone-creaking cold, I can easily imagine the bees turning into Popsicles, unable to move across their honey frames, and then starving to death.

Behind the Scenes Beekeeping: February 2017

February 28th, 2017.

Here’s another instalment of the amazing Cell Phone Chronicles. This one is 33 minutes long. It was recorded in February 2017. Again, it’s just me standing around my beehives talking about bees. At one point I talk about making sugar cakes flavoured with honey and then I put them in some beehives. I talk about how Russian bees go through the winter with a smaller cluster compared to standard Italian honey bees. I also talk about how great snow is as an insulator. (Most of the hives in this video are buried in snow.) There are some shots of my cat, a squirrel and other amazing things.

I don’t expect this video to get over 4 million views. I’ll be impressed if four people can sit through the whole thing. There will be more to see in these cell phone chronicles once I get into the warmer months and actually do some beekeeping apart from standing around hoping my bees aren’t freezing to death.
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